Fun Stuff

October 27, 2014

Futbol in Argentina

Futbol 2By: Noemi Gamel

While we were in Buenos Aires, we decided to go to a futbol (aka soccer to you Americans) match. Tristan loves futbol but had never been to a live game before.

Argentina has the reputation for having some of the most devout and passionate futbol fans in the world. In fact, that might be an understatement. When we posted on FaceBook that we were attending a game, our futbol-fanatic Salvadorian friend commented, “I bow down to your courage.”

To avoid the complex ticket buying process, we went with a tour group whose sole purpose is to buy tickets and escort tourists to futbol matches. Our guide, Santiago, confirmed that Argentinian fans have a checkered past: due to violent outbursts during games, the government no longer allows “away” fans in the stadiums. Imagine attending a sporting event in the states and only the home team was allowed to have fans in the stands. Needless to say things were a little different. Also, no alcohol is permitted inside the futbol stadiums.

Without the fear of fistfights or lynchings (though we were advised which team to cheer for), we attended the game with cautious optimism. Santiago reassured us constantly, but also insisted on the group (made up of non-BA Argentinians, Australians, and us) sticking close to him. We had a blast! The kids enjoyed their snacks of sugared peanuts and “gaseosa”, which is essentially soda. We were up in the “cheap seats” but the energy of the stadium permeated all the way up to our stands.

The enthusiasm emanating from the crowed was unrivaled. This was a rival match between two of Argentina’s top teams and the fans sang and cheered non-stop during the entire game. Like a unified choir, they sang out and danced coordinated chants. It was impossible not to be infected by their energy.

The fans, though energetic, were polite and well behaved. Of course, the armed police may have done a lot to quell passions. In the end, we had a great time and Tristan is eagerly awaiting his next game.

Futbol 3

Futbol 1



October 20, 2014

Iguazu Falls

By: Noemi Gamel

Kara and Tristan by the falls

Kara and Tristan by the falls

There is something magical about waterfalls. Perhaps it is the power they convey, the crystalline beauty of the curtain of water, or the deafening roar they produce.  You can imagine our delight to witnessing arguably the most spectacular waterfalls in the world, in Puerto Iguazu, Argentina.

When we first entered Iguazu National Park, I felt like we were in an Argentinian version of Disney World. The place felt commercial, very well organized and clean. There was even a little train to take us around the park. All concerns that we were going to be met by a mechanical band of bears melted when I turned the corner and caught my first glimpse of Iguazu Falls.

Words cannot describe the majesty and beauty of this wonder of nature, but Chris’s photos sure do. Almost 300 individual waterfalls merge together to create Iguazu Falls, resulting is a waterfall that is taller and twice as wide as Niagara Falls, with 3,300,000 gallons of water flowing over the falls every second!

Kara and Tristan loved getting as close as possible to the falls in the lower paths to get drenched by its mist. I have to admit we were coming up with some pretty gruesome speculations of what would happen to the human body if one were to fall on the rocks below.  It is no wonder there is a strict rule forbidding parents from carry their children piggy back on the paths near the falls.

The view from the upper paths was equally stunning, but more crowded. The tour buses arrived around 10 am, so we were very glad we had arrived early to enjoy the views with some semblance of solitude.

Iguazu Falls 4

The falls from above

Iguazu Falls 2

Iguazu Falls



October 13, 2014

Tips for More Pleasant Bus Travel

By Noemi Gamel

Bus Ride

Kara and Tristan – 12 hours into a 13 hour bus ride in Argentina

Growing up in the United States, we tend to view bus rides with trepidation. They are uncomfortable, slow, and rarely seem to run at  the time or along the route we need. We knew that buses would be part of our around the world trip, but it wasn’t a form of  transportation we were looking forward too.

Imagine our surprise when we boarded our first extended bus ride in Peru (20 hours).  Many of the buses in South America are  amazing. Huge, comfortable seats that recline a full 180 degrees (think first class on a plane and you get the picture of what a “cama”  seat is like). They even provide decent food service.

After three months of using buses in South America, we have some tips to make bus travel more comfortable. These will be especially useful if you have kids.

Use a backpack instead of a suitcase. A backpack is easier to maneuver around bus stations that may not have elevators or ramps. It is also easier to carry in case you can’t use the luggage compartment under the bus, which sometimes you can’t do if your final destination is not that route’s end of the line.

Pack entertainment. Chris and I have a “carry-on” bag where we make sure to keep materials to keep the kids (and us) entertained on the bus, especially the long ones such as our 20 hour bus ride to Cusco, Peru or our 12 hour ride to Puerto Iguazu, Argentina. We carry Uno cards, a standard deck of cards, and yes, their iPADs (loaded with books, movies, and games). Make sure those electronics are fully charged before you get on the bus, as most of them do not have plugs.

Pack snacks. Many of the longer, upscale buses will provide meals, but options are limited and they can be unappealing to kids. Other times, you will not have time to buy food at the bus stops or your options may not be good. Pack snacks like fruit, crackers, or empanadas to prevent hunger-related meltdowns.

Bring antibacterial gel and toilet paper. In countries outside the United States, sometimes you will not find soap or toilet paper in public bathrooms such as the ones in bus stations. One time, in Bolivia, the bus stopped at a remote rest area and when I asked where the toilet was, I was directed to an open field with grazing llamas. It helps to have a sense of humor.

What useful tips do you have for using public transportation in Latin America? Share your advise, tips, and tricks in the comments!



September 2, 2014

Why We Loved Salar de Uyuni

By: Noemi Gamel

We spent four glorious days traveling through the Bolivian Altiplano and the Salar de Uyuni (salt flats). Six weeks into our yearlong round the world trip, we all agree that the Salar de Uyuni is our favorite part so far. Interestingly, we all have different reasons why we enjoyed traveling through Uyuni and we want to share them with you.

Chris

As a wildlife photographer, Chris loved the biscachas (squirrel-like bunnies) of the Inca corridor, zorros (fox) near our rock hotel, and flamingoes in the Red lake. No other place we have visited so far had as much wildlife as this highland desert. Since we were on a private tour, he was able to ask the driver to stop whenever we had a good wildlife sighting. At one point, I told Raul, our driver, and Carla, our guide, that we had to pull him back in the car or he would stay shooting biscachas all day long.

Noemi

I loved learning about the history, archeology, and geological intricacies of the area. The tour was also a culturally eye-opening experience because we learned how the Andean people live in this harsh environment. Next time I feel like complaining about slow Wi-Fi, I will remember the huts with no running water or electricity in the Altiplano desert. I also enjoyed getting to know our guide and driver, Carla and Raul. They were wonderful.

Kara

Kara’s favorite part of the Salar Uyuni trip was taking the “crazy pictures” in the middle of the salt flat. Because there is no way to gage distance, you can come up with some funky images with your camera. We took a picture of a gorilla eating us, Tommy the Frog chasing us, driving inside a boot, and Chris stepping on us with his shoe.

Tristan

Tristan’s favorite thing to do in the world is to climb trees. While there are no trees in the Bolivian highland desert, we encountered many rock formations that he wasted no time in climbing, including the Army of Corals, the Stone Tree area, Valle de las Rocas, and Pia Pia Island.
Whenever you are afraid to travel to a remote and harsh place such as the Altiplano with the whole family, set your fears aside. The whole family can have fun and extract different joys from the experience.

Kara and Tristan playing with perspective at Salar de Uyuni

Kara and Tristan playing with perspective at Salar de Uyuni

The striking landscape at Salar de Uyuni

The striking landscape at Salar de Uyuni



August 25, 2014

Welcome to the Witches’ Market

This week’s post from the Gamel family’s yearlong journey around the world, written by Noemi Gamel, with photography by Chris Gamel:

Dried llama fetuses

Dried llama fetuses

We spent two nights in La Paz, Boliva to break up the traveling between Copacabana/Isla del Sol and Salar de Uyuni. We meant to use those days to catch up on work and rest. On arriving, we learned that our hotel was just one block away from the Mercado de Brujas, or Witches’ Market. So shortly after breakfast, we took the opportunity to visit this offbeat and wickedly delightful shopping area.

The Mercado de Brujas is not a typical market. It is a single street lined with shops dedicated to meeting your supernatural needs as well as materials to participate in the worship of the traditional Inca gods. You will find mummified llamas to burn as an offering to Pachamama (Mother Earth) and stone toad effigies to pray for good fortune. You will find all sorts of oils to alleviate any ailment imaginable or to enhance, ahem, your performance in the bedroom.

As I was walking down the Mercado de Brujas with Chris and the kids, a woman presented a dried llama fetus to me…twice! The llama fetus is supposed to bring you fertility, an important feature in a culture where the more children a person has, the more their blessings from the old gods (Pachamama and company) and the new (Catholicism). Apparently, she thought two children were not enough to bring me a blessed life. I declined to purchase this souvenir, as I did not know how customs agents would react to a llama fetus in my backpack, and I did not want to contribute to the llama fetus market.

For those who are faint of heart, you can also purchase scarfs, handbags, and clothes at the Mercado de Brujas that have nothing to do with the supernatural. If you are ever in La Paz, make sure to visit this place!

What is the strangest souvenir you have purchased or encountered on your travels?



August 19, 2014

Wait! I Thought I Spoke Spanish!

This week’s post from the Gamel family’s yearlong journey around the world, written by Noemi Gamel, with photography by Chris Gamel:

Practicing local Spanish at the market

Practicing local Spanish at the market

While traveling through Peru and Bolivia, I have experienced some comical results using my native Mexican Spanish in South America. Just as my British friends look at me quizzically when I say “y’all” and I do not understand them when they say “lorry” instead of truck, I am finding that different colloquialisms can cause confusion in Spanish.

When we first arrived in Lima, Peru to start our Round the World trip, I went to a small Mercado (market) to find dinner items. I found tomatoes, bananas, bread, and cheese. In Spanish, I asked the woman if she had “aguacates” or avocados. She looked at me as if I had asked for chilled monkey brains. I described the avocado as a black vegetable with a “hueso” (which literally translates to bone) or large seed inside. She said she did not know what I was talking about.

I panicked at the notion that we would not eat avocadoes for 5 weeks while in Peru. My panic struck further when I thought that maybe there were no avocadoes in South America! The horror!

At a restaurant the next day, I found out that avocados are called “paltas” in South America and that they are green, not black. I also found out that the large seed inside is called a “pepa” or “semilla.” I can only imagine what that poor woman at the market in Lima thought about the crazy Mexican-American asking about a black vegetable with a bone inside!

I also found out that “ya” means “yes” or “certainly”. In my native Mexican Spanish, “ya” translates to “be quiet” or “stop it”. It is not a nice phrase. I was jarred by how often Peruvians and Bolivians say “ya” until I realized it was a positive, friendly term.

The lesson learned? Not all Spanish is created equal. And don’t punch the waiter when he says “ya” in Peru or Bolivia.
In future blog posts, I will list some useful Spanish phrases to know when traveling through Latin America, except Brazil of course, where they try to confuse you by speaking Portuguese.

Have you ever had a comical experience due to a misunderstanding withregional language? Share it with us in the comments below!



August 12, 2014

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu

Another post from the Gamel family’s year around the world:

Why would anyone wake up at 4:30 in the morning? There are only three
good reasons I can come up with:

1) Your  child is sick.

2) A job-related emergency.

3) To watch the sun rise over the majestic scenery of Machu Picchu.

The enigmatic ruins came into view as our bus wound up the
mountains. With that first glance, I understood why Machu Picchu is one
of the seven wonders of the world. Not only are the ruins an architectural
masterpiece, but the city still has a mystical quality that is palpable.

If you go to Peru, you must see Machu Picchu. If you do not hike the Inca
Trail to get there, take the earliest bus available at 5:30 am to get there
in time for sunrise. Take a boxed lunch so you are not in a hurry to get
back. Stroll through the ruins, sit facing Wayna Picchu while the sun
hits your face, and feel the energy in the rocks. Book your train out of
Aguas Calientes in the late afternoon so you can spend as much time as
possible in this wondrous place.



August 4, 2014

Cristo Blanco in Cusco, Peru

Cristo Blanco in Cuzco, Peru

Cristo Blanco in Cuzco, Peru

This week’s post from the Gamel family’s yearlong journey around the world, written by Noemi Gamel, with photography by Chris Gamel:

On July 28th, Peru celebrated its Independence Day, commemorating its proclamation of freedom from Spanish Rule in 1821. Chris and the kids had no Spanish classes that day, so we decided to spend the day as tourists in Cusco.

We started the day by having breakfast at Jack’s, a breakfast institution in Cusco. Then we walked to the Plaza de Armas to hop on one of the double decker city tour buses. The tour started through the main Plaza and worked its way up the valley until culminating at Cristo Blanco or White Christ. The structure is eight meters high and overlooks the beautiful Cusco Valley. I was struck by the history behind the Cristo Blanco. The structure was created by local artist Francisco Olazo Allende, who also built the arc of Santa Clara. The funding for Cristo Blanco was a donation by the Arabic Palestinian community who sought refuge in Cusco after World War II, in gratitude for the Cusquenos’ hospitality and sanctuary.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.” ― Mark Twain

I thought about this quote by Mark Twain as our guide told us the story of the Cristo Blanco. As a traveler, who is neither Catholic nor Muslim, I saw beauty in its marble, stone, and history.



July 31, 2014

Peru’s Delicious Huancaína Sauce

Watch this video to see how Huancaina sauce is made!

Watch this video to see how Huancaina sauce is made!

Peruvian cuisine is quickly gaining worldwide esteem for its bold flavors and the increasing diversity of international influences. Despite recent culinary innovation, the traditional staples are still a huge part of daily life in Peru; authentic dishes combining native ingredients with both indigenous and colonial cooking methods remain common fare.

The country’s Andean highlands benefit from an unbelievable variety of potatoes and corn, as well as grains like the quinoa that has grown so popular among health nuts in the U.S.

But one particularly delicious staple of traditional Peruvian cuisine is Huancaína (wahn-kah-ee-na) sauce. It’s a thick, spicy (due to yellow aji peppers), yellow cheese sauce that every Peruvian knows intimately and every visitor falls in love with. The name just means that the sauce originated in the Huancayo region in the central highlands, but it’s now typical of the country in general.

The most common usage of Huancaína is in the dish “Papa a la Huancaína,” which consists of boiled and sliced potatoes, placed atop a salad and smothered with a generous helping of the addictive sauce. It would be difficult to find a home or restaurant in which Papa a la Huancaína isn’t served.

On her recent Peru Family Trek, our Family Travel Advisor Grace was lucky enough to watch our friend Cristina preparing the classic sauce — check out the video she recorded of the process!



July 30, 2014

The Kackleys in Cuba

Jim and his family just returned from Cuba and had a tremendous, eye-opening experience! Below are some photos with interesting comments from Jim and his son, Christian.

 

I remember walking up to the man who owned this car and was surprised by how willing he was to let us sit in it and talk all about it. He even opened up the hood and showed us the engine.

“I remember walking up to the man who owned this car and was surprised by how willing he was to let us sit in it and talk all about it. He even opened up the hood and showed us the engine.” – Christian

This and the other dinner with a local family were tied for first with the beach day we had with some local college kids. I had so much fun talking to them, practicing my spanish and basically just having normal conversations with someone who spoke a different language. Although Amalia did know some English so she would ask me a question in English and I would try and answer in Spanish or vice versa.

“This and the other dinner with a local family were tied for first with the beach day we had with some local college kids. I had so much fun talking to them, practicing my spanish and basically just having normal conversations with someone who spoke a different language. Although Amalia did know some English so she would ask me a question in English and I would try and answer in Spanish or vice versa.” – Christian

"This was the other family we had dinner with, the mom actually spoke French so Josh talked to her in French a little bit. This was a lot of fun just like the other dinner, possibly even more so because the girl knew English almost fluently. She got frustrated by my bad Spanish so we talked in English the whole night."

“This was the other family we had dinner with, the mom actually spoke French so Josh talked to her in French a little bit. This was a lot of fun just like the other dinner, possibly even more so because the girl knew English almost fluently. She got frustrated by my bad Spanish so we talked in English the whole night.” – Christian

e.

".  Here is a great one of two Cuban girls who wandered into Café de Maria after 9pm to sit and have their espresso.  In my family I am the only able to drink coffee in the afternoon." - Jim

“Here is a great one of two Cuban girls who wandered into Café de Maria after 9pm to sit and have their espresso. In my family I am the only one able to drink coffee in the afternoon.” – Jim

"This was quite possibly one of the coolest things I've ever done. This is a live bee hive with very real bees flying around it. The lady opened it up and fearlessly started drinking honey from the hive. We were all shocked until she explained that the bees had no stinger."

“This was quite possibly one of the coolest things I’ve ever done. This is a live bee hive with very real bees flying around it. The lady opened it up and fearlessly started drinking honey from the hive. We were all shocked until she explained that the bees had no stinger.” – Christian