Posts Tagged ‘Thailand’

May 26, 2015

The Best Regions to Vacation in Thailand

Thailand very well may be one of the most interesting and diverse countries in the world, making it a great destination for families. It is home to a long history, rich culture, dense rain forests, and beautiful beaches. Thailand’s unique culture comes from bordering four other countries, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, and Malaysia, and its large expatriate population. Thailand is a true international crossroads and each region is special in its own way. Here are three different regions in Thailand that we love and are perfect for family vacations!

The Urban Epicenter

bangkok1

Bangkok is home to over 8 million people, which accounts for over 12% of the nation’s population. Nearly 720,000 people living in Bangkok are expatriates, making Bangkok a truly global city. Bangkok was also once referred to as “Venice of the East” because of its intricate canal system and because its buildings used to sit on stilts. Most of the canals have been filled in and the buildings now sit on solid ground, but the incredible architecture of the city remains. One of the best viewpoints of Bangkok is from the Chao Phraya River. The breeze you catch while on a long-tail boat is cooling and welcoming as you sit in the sun! You can even take a boat right to the Grand Palace and Wat Pho, the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, two of Thailand’s most marvelous structures. It is highly possible and probable that Bangkok is one of the most vibrant, busy, and exciting cities in the world. Your kids will be in absolute awe taking part in the daily hustle!

The Rose of the North

While Bangkok is indisputably the most famous, popular, and important city in Thailand, Chiang Mai cannot be overlooked. Historically, Chiang Mai was the capital of the Kingdom of Lanna from 1296-1768. Although the Lanna Kingdom no longer exists, its traditions and culture still do and there is no place they flourish like in Chiang Mai. The speed of life in the North is much slower and more relaxed than Bangkok. Chiang Mai is a great place for the arts (it’s in the middle of a bid to be named a Creative City by UNESCO) and it’s great for nature lovers- most of the Chiang Mai province is forests and parks. The highest point in Thailand, Doi Inthanon, is just outside of Chiang Mai and offers a gorgeous climb for hikers! Our favorite part of Chiang Mai though is the elephant conservation and rehabilitation farms. Not only do they do great work, but they teach you to train, bathe, feed, and ride elephants over the course of a day. These smart creatures are friendly, take great pictures, and won’t ever forget you!

The Islands of the South

If you take the laid back nature of Chiang Mai and multiply it by ten, you’ll get a sense of the pace of island life in Thailand. Some of the most beautiful beaches in the world are on Thai islands. The most famous and possibly most scenic is Phuket. This is the largest island in Thailand and perfect for the family trying to relax on the beach and play in the water. The sand is soft, white, and not too hot. The beach disappears into emerald Phuket1and teal waters that seem too beautiful to be real. Dotted throughout Phang Nga Bay are limestone islands that stand tall out of the water and make for a surreal view. This backdrop makes for the holiday card of the century! There are also plenty of places for snorkeling, kayaking, swimming, boat rides, and searching for hidden caves and lagoons- the kids won’t ever get bored!

These three areas of Thailand are all very different and unique in their own way. Going to one is memorable- going to all three is unforgettable! Thailand has all of the ingredients to make for the family vacation of a lifetime.



August 4, 2011

Do you know where your kids are Planking?

I’ve been back from Thailand for almost two weeks now, and am finally beginning to feel like my old self. This jet lag laid a heavy cloak of exhaustion over me! Yet don’t think for a minute it wasn’t all worth it. Thailand is an absolute gem.

Over the next couple of weeks I’ll be writing more about this adventure, but for starters I want to relish in how great it was to travel with a terrific group of teenagers who all did their part in reminding me of the joys and challenges of parenting. You know how they love you but get embarassed by you most of the time?

Traveling with your own kids lets you see them in a different world; you often learn new things about them in a new environment where they can let their guard down a bit. But if you really want to know about what’s happening, travel with other families too. The interactions and conversations you can accidently overhear will teach you gobs about what is trending today.

Take PLANKING. Now, I like to think I am up to date on current trends but this one had escaped me. Is it going to the gym and building muscle as you hold yourself stiff as a board? No, not at all. Planking means lying yourself face down, arms at your side in any bizarre place you choose. Like at a temple, or on an elephant.

This is not a rock, it is an elephant

No kidding, there is even a whole Wiki page about it. Also, did you know about family traditions, like taking the same posed photo everywhere they go? Really, like in front of the bathroom signs. Imagine having a lifetime of photos of the kids in front of bathroom signs in every language. This is so cool! (and I’m sorry I do not have a sample to show you right now).

So get hip, stay young, and go on an adventure with a bunch of fun loving kids – and their parents – who can teach you everything you need to know about current fads.

And don’t forget to ask your kids where they’ve been planking lately.



July 7, 2011

How to Build an Adventure

Fly 6 hours to London – amazing how close it is, right?

Spend all day in London. Maybe you meet up with a friend like I did, maybe you head into Windsor Castle or maybe you hang at Heathrow. I do recommend paying 17.95 GBP for three hours in the Executive Lounge. Very civilized, and free wireless too.

Then fly 3 hours to Helsinki, Finland. Suddenly you are surrounded by blonde haired, blue eyed travel companions.

Connect smoothly to your flight to Bangkok; just another 7 or 8 hours.

Stumble into Suvarnabhami airport, one of the most bustling and perhaps chaotic airports I can remember. Go through customs and immigration, collect your bag (it made it!), find yourself surrounded by people wanting to get you a cab, a massage, a tour. But all you want is to figure out how to get back to check in for the next flight!

Up to the third floor to the check in desk. But they won’t take the ticket you bought online because you don’t have the same credit card with you. Go to a different counter to refund the original ticket, and buy a new one at the same price. Back to check in, through immigration again, through security again, to the gate for the 45 minute flight to Siem Reap.

I’ve learned the Airport Thais are indeed as gracious and soft spoken as I’d read. The Airport Cambodians are gruff and abrupt and have scowls on their faces. Tomorrow I am sure I will learn more as i venture out into the streets with my guide.

Right now? I hear the call of my choice of TWO channels of karaoke on the hotel television!

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April 18, 2011

Thailand for Families Happening Now

The Colors of Thailand

We are running our first group to Thailand July 9, 2011. I am going too, and we’re looking for of a couple of families with kids 7 – 12 to come along with our group. Space is limited! This 2 week event is being offered at cost, $3500 per person (no discounts apply); in addition we ask you to bring your sense of adventure and good spirit. There is no question we will have a great time! There are temples, elephants, rafting, biking, beaches and snorkeling. And lots of an interesting culture, and spicy spicy food (if you dare!)

What do you want to know about visiting Thailand?

Approximately 95% of Thai people are Buddhist. Their value system affects their dress and social behavior, and tends to be much more conservative than the average Westerner. So let’s be prepared to respect their culture.

Shorts are considered improper and low-class attire, only acceptable for schoolchildren. Except at beach resorts you should never wear skimpy shorts, halter tops, or low-cut blouses. In the temples long trousers or skirts must be worn. Think before you pack!

Thais believe the head is the most acred part of the body. Never pat a Thai on the head, not even a child. And the foot is the lowest part, considered dirty. Don’t point your foot at someone, it is a terrible insult. So… keep your hands and your feet to yourself.

Thailand has a non-confrontational society. No matter how frustrated you may feel, do not lose your temper or raise your voice. What a good thing to practice…

Come bring your jai yen (cool heart) to Thailand, bow your head in the wai(traditional greeting), and join a wonderful adventure with Thomson.